ASBP: A Commander Lives to Save Lives
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A Commander Lives to Save Lives

05/18/2018
By Shawntel Trowell, ASBP blood donor recruiter, National Capital Region
Medical Service Corps Officer Army Col. Jason Sepanic is recognized by the Armed Services Blood Bank Center – Bethesda for his commitment to donating. Pictured here receiving his one gallon pin and certificate. (Photo Credit: Melissa Myers, Public Affairs, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command)
Medical Service Corps Officer Army Col. Jason Sepanic is recognized by the Armed Services Blood Bank Center – Bethesda for his commitment to donating. Pictured here receiving his one gallon pin and certificate. (Photo Credit: Melissa Myers, Public Affairs, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command)
Many senior officers support the Armed Services Blood Program (ASBP), but most are not eligible to donate due to European travel. Medical Service Corps Officer, Army Col. Jason Sepanic is one of the few who can donate and does so on a regular basis.

Sepanic, who currently serves as the medical logistics and operational planning officer, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, faithfully donated blood in high school and college with a civilian blood program. Almost 23 years ago, at his first duty station in Korea, he took a break from donating as there were no locations or opportunities to do so. Once arriving at his second duty station at Fort Lewis, Washington, he started donating again, this time with the ASBP and has not stopped since.

“I prefer donating to ASBP because I know that the blood will be used on a Soldier or his/her family member,” Sepanic said.

Sepanic knows the importance of the program from when he was serving with the 4th Infantry Division as the Forward Support Medical Company commander in Iraq. During his time there, the division had suffered the highest casualty rate and number of killed-in-actions.

“Although we lost some people, we saved even more. Having a forward surgical team attached to our brigade and the ability to push blood meant a great deal. Blood management was one of my top priorities in ensuring the FST was always ready.”

“Giving blood is not about wanting to get recognized,” said Sepanic. “I donate blood to ASBP because it is my way of continuing to support the Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, and Marines who are on the front lines and ensuring they get the best possible care on the battlefield or wherever they may be in medical need.”

About the Armed Services Blood Program
Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. As one of four national blood collection organizations trusted to ensure the nation has a safe, potent blood supply, the ASBP works closely with our civilian counterparts by sharing donors on military installations where there are no military blood collection centers and by sharing blood products in times of need to maximize availability of this national treasure. To find out more about the ASBP or to schedule an appointment to donate, please visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil. To interact directly with ASBP staff members, see more photos or get the latest news, follow @militaryblood on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, Pinterest and @usmilitaryblood on Instagram. Find the drop. Donate.

The Armed Services Blood Program is a proud recipient of the Army Maj. Gen. Keith L. Ware Public Affairs award for journalism.