ASBP: ‘Enduring Warrior’ to Attend, Speak at West Point Blood Drive
Skip NavigationSkip Navigation
Give to the Red White & Blue - The Official Website of the United States Military Blood Program
Clock Symbol Korea
Japan
Hawaii
West Coast
Wash D.C.
Zulu
Germany
Iraq
Afghanistan
Give Blood Now
Keith L. Ward award


Subscribe to our eNewsletter
 
Safe Subscribe Logo


Follow Navy Captain Fahie, program director, as he visits critical military blood program locations.

Visit the ASBP page on Health.mil
Share/Bookmark
 Print Button

‘Enduring Warrior’ to Attend, Speak at West Point Blood Drive

01/04/2018
By Dave Conrad, ASBP blood donor recruiter, Fort Hood, Texas
The Armed Services Blood Program is hosting their largest annual blood drive Jan. 8-11 at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York . This year, there is a unique opportunity for the West Point community to not only save lives but to meet a wounded veteran whose life was saved.

Retired Army Staff Sgt. Earl Granville will be at the drive on Jan. 9, in the afternoon, to talk with donors and share his experiences as a wounded warrior, veteran and adaptive athlete. Many will recognize Granville from the viral footage and pictures of him carrying his guide across the finish line during the Boston Marathon in 2017.

His story as a wounded warrior began in the summer of 2008 while on a patrol in Zormat, Afghanistan. His vehicle was hit by a roadside bomb resulting in the amputation of his left leg through the knee.

“I was getting blood transfusions in Bagram while I was still in Afghanistan and throughout my time at Walter Reed,” Granville said, at an ASBP event in 2017. “If you really break it down, I had my limb replaced with an artificial limb. You can’t make artificial blood.”

Granville is an adaptive athlete who has competed in events such as GoRuck, Endurance Challenges and Spartan races. He is a spokesperson for Operation Enduring Warrior, a “veteran operated non-profit organization whose mission is to honor, empower and motivate America’s wounded military service members,” according to their website.

The ASBP blood drive will be from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day at Eisenhower “Ike” Hall, 655 Pitcher Road. In addition to the opportunity to meet Granville, donors will receive a long-sleeved t-shirt and other incentive items based on availability.

Since 1962, the ASBP has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. All blood donated during the drive will directly support service members, veterans and military families at treatment facilities around the world.

“Donating blood is one way everyone can pitch in and help people recover from illness or injury.” explains Army Maj. James Burke, officer in charge, Robertson Blood Center, Fort Hood, Texas and ASBP lead of the 2017 West Point drive. “It doesn’t cost anything but a few minutes of your day and the benefits are lifesaving and life-changing.”

For more information about the drive, please contact Dave Conrad ASBP blood donor recruiter, at (254) 287-7113 or david.m.conrad4.civ@mail.mil.

About the Armed Services Blood Program
Since 1962, the Armed Services Blood Program has served as the sole provider of blood for the United States military. As a tri-service organization, the ASBP collects, processes, stores and distributes blood and blood products to Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families worldwide. As one of four national blood collection organizations trusted to ensure the nation has a safe, potent blood supply, the ASBP works closely with our civilian counterparts by sharing donors on military installations where there are no military blood collection centers and by sharing blood products in times of need to maximize availability of this national treasure. To find out more about the ASBP or to schedule an appointment to donate, please visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil. To interact directly with ASBP staff members, see more photos or get the latest news, follow @militaryblood on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube and Pinterest. Find the drop. Donate.

The Armed Services Blood Program is a proud recipient of the Army Maj. Gen. Keith L. Ware Public Affairs award for journalism.